Rapture, Blister, Burn – Get to Know Jenna Rose Graupmann

20% Theatre Company is thrilled to present Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo at the Minneapolis Theatre Garage April 26 – May 10, 2014. Learn a little bit about the artists involved in this production. In this interview, meet Jenna Rose Graupmann!

Costume Designer

Costume Designer

Can you tell us a little but about yourself and your background? How/when/why did you get into theatre?

My name is Jenna Rose Graupmann. I graduated last May from the University of Northern Iowa with an undergraduate degree in Theatrical Design and Production, as well as minors in Art History and French Language. Ever since I was old enough to hold a crayon, I’ve considered myself a visual artist, however, I’ve always been intrigued by theatre as visual spectacle meets storytelling. I became limitedly involved with theatre in high school, but it wasn’t until entering UNI that I discovered how well my artistic talent could accent the collaborative creativity of theatre.

Tell us how you originally got involved with 20% Theatre Company?

Rapture, Blister, Burn is my debut with 20% Theatre Company. While participating in summer stock in Utah in 2012, I heard about 20% Theatre and the thought-provoking plays that are produced there. After researching more about the company and others in the Twin Cities, I realized that I wanted to design shows that were not only entertaining, but which also shed light on contemporary societal issues. This knowledge also prompted me to move here after graduating from UNI to pursue a freelance career in costume design.

What are you designing in this show? As a designer, what do you find most exciting about working with this script/production?

I’m designing costumes for Rapture and am so thrilled to be working on this production with the company that first inspired me to move to Minneapolis/St. Paul. I’ve always considered myself a feminist, and so it was easy to fall in love with Gianfriddo’s script and the questions posed therein.

What is your favorite genre or type of theater to design? What are some plays on your design “dream list”?

My favorite shows to design are shows that raise thought-provoking issues with complex characters. Equally, however, I also love to design period shows with intricate costume needs. I would love to design a classic comedy like The Importance of Being Earnest, My Fair Lady, or Tartuffe.

Rapture, Blister, Burn is often called “a feminist play”. How would you describe the play? How do you feel about feminism and what it signifies today?

Feminism has always been a constantly evolving movement, serving every generation of complex women and their societal needs. The women of Rapture, Blister, Burn try to identify how feminist ideals have impacted their lives, only to discover that there are numerous, oftentimes contradictory, ways to exemplify feminism in everyday life. Today, many think that the “feminist fight” is over. This notion is completely absurd. The media still bombards our culture with patriarchal views: Katie Couric’s journalism is secondary to her wardrobe choices, action movie heroines are valued only for their sex appeal, domestic abuse and rape are the subject of jokes, and women still earn only 77 cents to every man’s dollar. Feminism has made a lot of progress if the women in Rapture can find fulfillment as stay-at-home mothers, activists, and students, but obviously not all of the questions posed by Rapture have been answered.

How do you personally balance the expectations of being female in our society with the concepts of feminism in your daily life? 

I think that by supporting myself financially, graduating from a university, and avoiding the media’s bombardment in television and popular magazines, I’ve upheld many expectations of what feminism means today. Granted, I probably still spend too much money on lingerie, clothing, and cosmetic products, and I quite enjoy when my boyfriend treats me to dinner, but I like to think that my priorities in balancing my agenda as a career woman and that of a silly 20-something girl are well placed!

What else do you do in the world, outside of theatre and/or working on this production?

In the world outside of the costume shop, I like to paint, visit art museums, ride my bike, and explore my new Twin Cities home.

Favorite guilty pleasure snack? 

My favorite guilty pleasure snack is a Tim-Tam slam. If you aren’t familiar with this Australian cookie-meets-hot-cocoa phenomenon, it’s high time you googled it!

How did you get to Minneapolis? (Where did you grow up? Where are you from?)

I’m originally from the Quad Cities and have visited family in Minnesota often. The vibrant theatre community prompted me to move to St. Paul post-graduation (see second question), and since then I have been delighted to call the Twin Cities my home.

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Rapture, Blister, Burn – Get to Know Rachel Finch

20% Theatre Company is thrilled to present Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo at the Minneapolis Theatre Garage April 26 – May 10, 2014. Here is your chance to learn a little bit about the artists involved in this production. Stay tuned for more interviews from our designers and director. Before we open the show, hear from our last actor, Rachel Finch!

Actor

Actor

Can you tell us a little but about yourself and your background? How/when/why did you get into theatre? 

I got cast in a play in second grade. The Brave Little Tailor. It was all downhill from there. 🙂 Kidding. I got into it in High School. That was where I fit in. I made the decision to major in Theater Performance at Viterbo University, and I’ve been enjoying the TC theater scene ever since.

Tell us a little about the character you will be playing in Rapture, Blister, Burn.

Avery is so much fun to play – she’s got a LOT of attitude, and says exactly what she thinks. Other people might see her as rude, but she’s just really, really honest, and she misses nothing. Like it or not, you are going to get the truth from this girl.  She’s still figuring out what she wants, and really is in a place where she has a lot of freedom, but is maybe longing for some of the security that comes with a steady relationship. Learning that she doesn’t actually have all the answers throws her for a loop towards the end of the show, and we see her grapple with that too.

In what ways do you personally relate to this character?

I’m definitely in a place in my life where some of the big choices (family, marriage, career) are on my mind a lot. Even though she’s a lot younger than I am, Avery still has all those options in front of her too, and is deciding what path to take. And like Avery, I’m kinda fuzzy on what it would mean to call myself a “feminist” in 2014.

What is exciting about your character? What are some of the challenges that you, as an actor, are facing in portraying this character?

Her honesty and humor are my favorite things. You always know where you stand. The challenge for me here is playing someone who is so intelligent, but also really young. Avery struggles with things that aren’t clear cut, like the How-To’s of successfully navigating a long distance relationship with her boyfriend.

Rapture, Blister, Burn is often called “a feminist play”. How would you describe the play? How do you feel about feminism and what it signifies today?

This is a really hard question because there is SO MUCH in this script to talk about. I keep telling Anya that the talk-backs are going to be 4 hours long. Feminism is really personal – even in rehearsals, its hard to explain how you feel about it without referencing your own life experience. Our careers, our relationships, family life – these are the things we use to define our value. So it is really personal, and people get really defensive over labels like “Just a Housewife” or “Lonely Career Woman” and with good reason, because this is who we are. This show asks those hard questions about what should you pursue, and what will you give up to get it?

How do you personally balance the expectations of being female in our society with the concepts of feminism in your daily life?

I think being a “feminist” has a looser definition than it has had in the past. I love being a woman, think one of the best things is about it is claiming that right to choose your own path and not apologize for it. I get tripped up, however, over the Miley Cyruses of the world. Is that feminism, because its her choice to dress in skimpy clothes and twerk her ass off? Or is she simply creating a cheap image of women as sex objects to get media attention? There are arguments on both sides. The other aspect of feminism that I see is really body-focused. Fat-shaming, Skinny-shaming, Dove Ads versus Victoria’s Secret models: what is the image of a “real” woman? There’s a lot of conflict over this as well. Randy said this in rehearsal and I think it kinda sums it up: you see a female celebrity on the cover of People Magazine with an article about an unflattering photo of themselves in a bathing suit. In the article, they all say “This is my body and I’m proud of it!”…. and then they lose 20 pounds. We’re torn between wanting to embrace our bodies as they are, and also wanting to fit society’s standards of beauty. We’re a work in progress.

What else do you do in the world, outside of theatre and/or working on this production?

I work in Human Resources at Twin Cities Public Television. I’m a novice runner, and starting to train for the Women Rock 1/2 Marathon in August.

Favorite restaurant to eat out at in the Twin Cities?

Salut Bar American. Fabulous wine, and really good beef. When I want a hamburger or steak, this is where I go.

How did you get to Minneapolis? (Where did you grow up? Where are you from?)

I grew up in Blaine, and while I still go there to visit my parents, I never want to live in a suburb again. I’m a city girl, and I have an apartment on Grand Avenue in St. Paul. I’ve lived in London and New Zealand as well.

Do you have any pets?

I have a tuxedo cat named Groucho, and I am absolutely smitten with him. I was always a dog person, and now I’m one of those women with a picture of her cat on her desk at work. How did this happen?

Rapture, Blister, Burn – Get to Know Christine Sweet

20% Theatre Company is thrilled to present Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo at the Minneapolis Theatre Garage April 26 – May 10, 2014. Opening night is less than a week away! We are giving you the chance to learn a little bit about the artists involved in this production. Meet Christine Sweet in this interview!

Actor

Actor

Can you tell us a little but about yourself and your background? How/when/why did you get into theatre? 

I was in an acting apprentice program in Boston many years ago. At age 25 I chose a different career path, radio broadcasting. I didn’t formally return to theater, i.e., auditioning, till a few years ago when I was cast in Freshwater Theatre Company’s Desperation Panties, directed by Claire Avitabile. Since then I’ve had roles in several Twin Cities theater productions, and it’s been like coming home. I am absolutely thrilled to be part of 20% Theatre’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn.

Tell us a little about the character you will be playing in Rapture, Blister, Burn.

Alice is the 70-ish mother of the lead character, Catherine. She has recently had a heart attack but does not want to be fussed over. She is devoted to her daughter and only child, whom she gave birth to later in life, and her goal is Catherine’s happiness and comfort. Unlike her daughter she’s not highly educated nor career-driven, but she’s perceptive and independent and I don’t think she could have raised a child like Catherine without possessing those traits. She’s enjoyed being a mother and has accepted her traditional role, but some of her advice for Catherine is a little surprising nonetheless. I imagine that Alice had quite an independent life as a single woman before she married and became a mother.In what ways do you personally relate to this character?Alice is a character from my mother’s generation, or the generation between my mother’s and mine. I’m a Boomer who came of age during a time of tremendous social change, including the women’s movement this play references, and my goals were facilitated by the feminism of that time. My life has been very different from my mother’s. However, I’m quite familiar with a lot of the traditional expectations of women that Alice represents, because those influenced my childhood and early adolescence as well.

Rapture, Blister, Burn is often called “a feminist play”. How would you describe the play? How do you feel about feminism and what it signifies today?  

Rather than a “feminist play”, I would call it a play about feminism. It’s also about anti-feminism. And the consequences of both – yes, there’s something for everyone here! And it’s not just for women! The play offers no pat conclusions but reflects back to us, through the views and experiences of three generations, the complexities of the places in which we continue to find ourselves. While it is a comedy, working on RBB has stimulated deep discussion among our cast and director, and I’m sure it will do so among audiences.

Personally, I owe some of my significant career opportunities in a male-dominated field to feminism. Regardless, it has not been an easy ride. There were few women in radio when I started, and it was uncharted territory. I could write a book. Maybe I will someday. I feel concerned when I hear some young women today wishing not to be identified as feminist, or with what they think the word means – I admit I’m not sure what it means to them. Feminism was and is about freedom and equal rights. It concerns me that we are still in danger of losing some of the rights gained by the women’s movement, even as we often take them for granted now. The sense of deja vu and “didn’t we already fight this battle?” is stunning and frequently discouraging. Like the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s, the struggle continues even while on the surface, so much progress has been made.

How do you personally balance the expectations of being female in our society with the concepts of feminism in your daily life?

Wow, I have so much to say about this, I couldn’t possibly cover it all here. The short version is, my life experiences have confirmed over and over that being true to myself is the most important thing to me. The point of feminism is having the freedom to do that, whatever it entails for me as a woman and whether or not all my desires coincide with feminist principles. Being told I can’t do something – a career, a sport, etc. – because I’m female was and is one of the most hurtful things I’ve ever heard in my life. But I never took it to heart, and feminism has helped me in that. Today in our society the opposite message is more prevalent, and I’m very glad of that.

What else do you do in the world, outside of theatre and/or working on this production?

I still work in radio, now as a producer after many years as an on-air host.

How did you get to Minneapolis? (Where did you grow up? Where are you from?)

I grew up in the Boston MA area and moved to Chicago in my late 20’s for a radio job. I’ve lived in the Twin Cities for over 30 years, having come here to work for MPR.

Rapture, Blister, Burn – Get to Know Kelli Gorr

20% Theatre Company is thrilled to present Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo at the Minneapolis Theatre Garage April 26 – May 10, 2014. In the weeks leading up to the show, we are giving you the chance to learn a little bit about the artists involved in this production. In this interview, meet actor, Kelli Gorr!

Actor

Actor

Can you tell us a little but about yourself and your background? How/when/why did you get into theatre?

Hi, my name is Kelli and I’m a recovering radio announcer. I spent 14 years as a DJ and talk show host in St. Cloud, MN. Now I lead Cargill’s Information Protection training and awareness activities globally.

I’ve been on stage since I was little. Dance. Theatre. Emcee. (You haven’t lived until you’ve emceed a Stearns Country Dairy Princess Pageant). Theatre is a hobby of mine and competes with dancing, biking, reading and watching films. Mostly I just like the applause.

Tell us a little about the character you will be playing in Rapture, Blister, Burn.

Gwen is a housewife (which is a rare breed these days). She dropped out of graduate school, married and started a family. Now at 40, with a failing marriage she wonders if she would have been happier if she had taken a different path. Gwen is not shy about letting others know how they fall short. She is the quintessential nag.

In what ways do you personally relate to this character?

One of the things I relate to is Gwen’s struggle to be happy with her life – to find contentment. Gwen struggles to find contentment and is often pushing and pulling those around her to do more and do it better. For me it’s a reminder to focus on what you have instead of what you lack.

What is exciting about your character? What are some of the challenges that you, as an actor, are facing in portraying this character?

Gwen is often oblivious to her selfishness. Playing some of those scenes with a straight face…that’s tough.

Rapture, Blister, Burn is often called “a feminist play”. How would you describe the play? How do you feel about feminism and what it signifies today?

Before this play I think I’d given roughly thirty seconds of thought in my life to feminism. I think the thought was, “Why would someone burn their bra?”

In my defense…

I’ve been fortunate enough to grow up in a country and time where it’s never occurred to me that I wouldn’t have the same opportunities as a man. I thank those who have done the hard work and crusading to make that possible. Maybe a woman not even thinking there are barriers to do and be whatever she likes is a measure of their hard work. That said, the play has definitely been an education.

What else do you do in the world, outside of theatre and/or working on this production?

My fiancée, Joel and I live in St. Paul, where we bought a home from 1887, which means lots of home improvement. This is the year I get the jungle (that is our yard) under control.  Bring on spring. When we’re not working on the house we’re seeing films, biking and boarding together (that’s a longboard skateboard for him) and seeing good Twin Cities theatre.

Favorite restaurant to eat out at in the Twin Cities?

Too tough. Too many I’d like to try again.

How did you get to Minneapolis? (Where did you grow up? Where are you from?)

I grew up in White Bear Lake, just north of St. Paul. I’ve also lived in Rice Lake, WI and St. Cloud, MN.

Do you have any pets?

Yes, two cats and a dog. Sméagol and Precious are our two cats and Chiyo is our long-haired Chihuahua. If you don’t like pets, I probably don’t trust you.

 

Rapture, Blister, Burn – Get to Know Reena Novotnak

20% Theatre Company is thrilled to present Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo at the Minneapolis Theatre Garage April 26 – May 10, 2014. In the weeks leading up to the show, we are giving you the chance to learn a little bit about the artists involved in this production. In this interview, meet our assistant stage manager, Reena Novotnak!

Assistant Stage Manager

Assistant Stage Manager

Can you tell us a little but about yourself and your background? How/when/why did you get into theatre? 

When I was 14 I had the opportunity to study at the Milwaukee Rep Summer Theater Conservatory. At the time, I thought I wanted to be a songwriter, and I did it to learn more about musical theater. To my surprise, I fell in love with theater instead. I went on to major in Dramatic Literature at Lawrence University and moved to Minneapolis in 2012 for an internship at The Plawyrights’ Center.Tell us how you originally got involved with 20% Theatre Company?A friend of mine, Kris Gebhard, performed in 20%’s Q-Stage last fall. When I saw that 20% was hiring for a show this spring, I jumped to apply!

What is your favorite part of the rehearsal/production process? What are some of the challenges?

My favorite part of the rehearsal process is that first moment when the chemistry between two actors becomes vibrant. It’s the second when the show really comes alive, when the story begins to feel real. My least favorite part? Moving furniture. Hands down.

What types of plays/shows do you enjoy stage managing the most, and why? What are some “dream shows” you’d love to stage manage?

I most enjoy stage managing shows that are a little on the abstract side– ones with dream sequences or elements that step out towards the fourth wall. For that reason, if I could stage manage any play, I think it might be Eugene O’Neill’s Desire Under the Elms. It’s absolutely in the realm of realism, but every emotion feels so heightened, and all of that gorgeous lighting…

Rapture, Blister, Burn is often called “a feminist play”. How would you describe the play? How do you feel about feminism and what it signifies today?

I would describe RBB as an exercise in second wave feminism, insofar as the feminism that I identify with has branched past a lot of the ideas that the play explores. When I think about feminism in my life, the idea of “having it all” is no longer part of the lens. At the same time, I don’t think I’m the intended audience for the message of the show. I know that “having it all” was absolutely the focus of my mother’s feminism, and to “to porn or not to porn” remains a large question for her generation.

How do you personally balance the expectations of being female in our society with the concepts of feminism in your daily life?

Being a woman still means being a second class citizen, and the goal of feminism is to end that oppression. Not only do women continue to struggle in the workplace making 77 cents for every male dollar, women’s bodies– particularly women of color and trans women– are trotted out for public consumption while as many as one in three women will be sexually assaulted in her lifetime. There has been a great deal of demonization of feminism as man-hating or extreme by those who stand to lose power in equality, but I don’t seen anything particularly extreme about asking to live safely.

What else do you do in the world, outside of theatre and/or working on this production?

I play the piano and sing, and I try to write plays… if I can sit still long enough.

Favorite place to eat out in the Twin Cities?

Lotus to Go Go in Loring Park

How did you get to Minneapolis? (Where did you grow up? Where are you from?)

I grew up in Milwaukee, and I moved to Minneapolis fall of 2012 for an internship at The Playwrights’ Center. Gosh, I just loved the cold so darn much I thought, “why not stay?” (Kidding of course)

Favorite song or band at the moment?

I’m loving Anaïs Mitchell, particularly her album “Hadestown” which is a gorgeous rock opera based on the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice.

Rapture, Blister, Burn – Get to Know Randy Funk

20% Theatre Company is thrilled to present Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo at the Minneapolis Theatre Garage April 26 – May 10, 2014. In the weeks leading up to the show, we are giving you the chance to learn a little bit about the artists involved in this production. In this interview, meet Randy Funk!

Actor

Actor


Can you tell us a little bit about yourself and your background? How/when/why did you get into theatre?

I started acting when I was in junior high school. I majored in theatre at Mankato State University (I know, I know.  But it was Mankato State when I went there and it will always be Mankato State to me.) I ran a theatre company called Pigs Eye Theatre for about five years, which gave me the opportunity to do some directing and writing as well.

Tell us a little about the character you will be playing in Rapture, Blister, Burn.

Don is a dean at what he describes as a fourth rate liberal arts college. He’s been married to Gwen for a number of years and has settled into a comfortable, if somewhat unfulfilling, life. He’s someone with great intelligence, but without the drive to do much more than what he’s doing.

In what ways do you personally relate to this character?

There are a lot of ways in which I relate to Don, but most of them are things I’d be more comfortable keeping to myself. Still, I can say we’re both at an age where you can’t help but look back and wonder, “What if I had done that instead of this?” or “What if this had happened to me rather than that?” But I’m a little more content with things than Don. I guess the best way to describe it is: I don’t have Don’s life, but I can see it from where I’m sitting.

What is exciting about your character? What are some of the challenges that you, as an actor, are facing in portraying this character?

Well, like I said, I relate to Don.  There are a lot of little moments where I think, “Wow, I’ve had that thought.” or “Jeez, I’ve had that said to me.” The challenge is not flinching when those things you relate to take you into uncomfortable areas. I mean, looking at yourself in the mirror can be nice, but maybe not when you’re naked.

Rapture, Blister, Burn is often called “a feminist play”. How would you describe the play? How do you feel about feminism and what it signifies today?

I think it’s a play that brings up and covers a lot of facets of feminism without telling the audience what its supposed to feel or think.  It’s a play that’s meant to be enjoyed, but also one that facilitates discussion.  I think feminism still has a very important role to play in our society. As long as there are people out there who will challenge a woman’s right to choose, who will question whether rape is really THAT bad, who, in general, are still willing to treat women as second class citizens, then feminism will be a much needed voice in the discussion.

How do you personally balance being male in our society with the concepts of feminism?

I think feminism makes me a better man.  Pure and simple.

What else do you do in the world, outside of theatre and/or working on this production?

I want to write mysteries when I grow up. That’s the thing I most want to do.  Also, I’m working on getting my son to brush his teeth without me ordering him to.

Favorite breakfast food?

An earth breakfast (hash browns and onions mixed into scrambled eggs and topped with cheese.)  Great, now I’m hungry.

How did you get to Minneapolis? (Where did you grow up? Where are you from?)

I grew up in Hibbing.  My family moved to the Cities area when I was a junior in high school.

Current favorite song or band?

This might sound weird, and I’m a little embarrassed to admit it, but until a few months ago, I’d never heard “Heroin” by The Velvet Underground or Patti Smith’s version of “Gloria”.  Now I’m pretty much obsessed with both of them.  Oh, and I want Oasis to get back together.  Who can I talk to about that?

 

Rapture, Blister, Burn – Get to Know Renee Werbowski

20% Theatre Company is thrilled to present Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo at the Minneapolis Theatre Garage April 26 – May 10, 2014. In the weeks leading up to the show, we are giving you the chance to learn a little bit about the artists involved in the creation of this production. For this interview, we’d love for you to meet actor, Renee Werbowski.

Renee Werbowski_2895

Actor

Can you tell us a little but about yourself and your background? How/when/why did you get into theatre?

I have a Theatre degree from Augsburg College. Though, at first, I figured I’d better study something “serious”, so I thought I’d be a chem major- get a lucrative job in the cosmetics industry.  Ha!  That lasted exactly a day and a half, because though I made good grades in math/science in HS, I dropped my first chem class (it was way way, way over my head) and swapped it for a film class (this was a suggestion from my French TA).  And who was I kidding anyway~ I’ve always wanted to be an actress.  I used to do commercials into the mirror for various products in the bathroom when I was only 5.  I’d do Cher impersonations for my babysitters.  I got a tape recorder for Christmas one year and did Soap Operas, commercials, man-on-the-street interviews and variety shows on it. Somebody somewhere has evidence of this on cassette tape.

The first show I got cast in after college was A Midsummer Night’s Dream with the MN Shakespeare Co.  After that, I sort of “fell into” VO work and commercials~ what I wanted to do all along.

Tell us a little about the character you will be playing in Rapture, Blister, Burn.

My character is Catherine, and she is having a midlife crisis of identity and maturity.  She’s missing a feeling of comfort and “home” in her life.  She’s having trouble coping with these feelings.  And, she isn’t thinking clearly about the solutions, to this loneliness, that present themselves to her.

In what ways do you personally relate to this character?

I can relate to Catherine in how I can find myself wanting something- missing something but upon review, I see that I haven’t put forth any energy at all into attaining that thing.

What is exciting about your character? What are some of the challenges that you, as an actor, are facing in portraying this character?

Its going to be challenging to play an accomplished, confident person who is also at the most vulnerable point in her life so far.  There are layers here, layers and layers that have to be included in the performance.

Rapture, Blister, Burn is often called “a feminist play”. How would you describe the play? How do you feel about feminism and what it signifies today?

This play IS a feminist play.  It discusses the past and the current state of feminism.  It explores, in a very funny and intelligent way, the newest frontiers in feminism and where we all fit into it.

How do you personally balance the expectations of being female in our society with the concepts of feminism in your daily life?

Well in the beginning, I was very attached to the idea that I had to make the exact same financial contribution as my mate and he should do the exact same amount of laundry (Avery’s 50/50 theory). However, I have tended over the years to take the female house-stuff role.   This arrangement has just happened to settle that way~or did it?  Good question for discussion later.  Though my husband is 100% supportive of my two freelance jobs, what I still struggle with as a woman is reminding myself that housework IS a valuable contribution.  The money I make IS a contribution.  And, to beware of when I start to think that presenting beauty/sexiness is surmount to anything else I have to present (at a party or an audition).  That notion still creeps into my mind alot and produces so much anxiety.  And now that I’m getting older, it’s even more important that I keep that sh… stuff in check!

What else do you do in the world, outside of theatre and/or working on this production?

I am also a fitness instructor and personal trainer.  These days, I teach mostly Yoga.

Favorite restaurant to eat out at in the Twin Cities?

Yes, all of ’em.  I hate to cook.

Where did you grow up? Where are you from?

I have always lived in St.Paul/Mpls.

Do you have any pets?

I have no pets (though we will get a dog. when we’re really ready. it’s a huge responsibility.)